A Good, Good Father

He grew up without a father. He met him when he was 35, but by that point, he was already an adult so any influence his father could have had on the man he became was long gone.

As a father himself now, he’s having to navigate fatherhood on his own. And that journey is a wild one.

Every morning he wakes the kids up for school. They could use an alarm clock, but he likes the process of waking them up. Most mornings begin with giggling and giant smiles.

He also walks them to school every day. They’re big enough to walk themselves, but he enjoys the quarter mile daily walk with them to start the day. Pelting each other with hardened berries from the tree that hangs over the fence. Tripping over each other to avoid the dead squirrel on the edge of the sidewalk. Teasing their classmates as they gather each morning on the blacktop in the few minutes before the school bell rings.

He shares with his kids his love of the Yankees, cycling and running, travel, good food and Italy. From early on, he’s talked to them about complex subjects – taking responsibility when you make a mistake, money management and investing, the inevitability of failure and how to handle it, sex and all the conflicting and confusing messages, faith and the complexities of loving Christ as broken people in a broken world – but always on a level that they can understand.

As a younger man, he never envisioned that fatherhood would be part of his story. He said he wasn’t planning on having kids. If you asked him now, he’d brush off the idea that he’s a good father.

But do you want to know the kind of father he is? Just look at his kids.

2 thoughts on “A Good, Good Father

Add yours

  1. Beautiful, Becky. Does your husband have a New York accent? I can’t tell in the pictures but he is a Yankee fan.

    On Fri, Nov 13, 2020 at 10:19 AM These Words of Mine wrote:

    > Becky Giovagnoni posted: ” He grew up without a father. He met him when he > was 25, but by that point, he was already an adult so any influence his > father could have had on the man he became was long gone. As a father > himself now, he’s having to navigate fatherhood on his own. A” >

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